Cold, confusing and clumsy Copenhagen

To start my 2017 correctly I travelled to Copenhagen for 4 days. A mini break before the chaos of university and the looming realisation that deadlines are close.

The 3 words I have used in the title are the perfect roundup.

Cold:

Because in January with temperatures of -8C on a good day and continuous blustery winds that cause the air to feel like -12C, Copenhagen is bloody freezing!

Confusing:

The most prominent feeling of Copenhagen was confusing. Everyday I felt another confusion bubble inside of me as I questioned their design choices; including having a metro exit in a shopping centre or the metro having no driver.Although peculiar, the city is spectacular especially in the snow.

Clumsy:

Although the cobbled streets were beautiful and quaint, they made me trip a grand total of 25 times. 15 of said trips were in 24 hours – not my best balance I must admit.

De nada (No problem)

I’ve been exploring the shores of the Dominican Republic for two weeks and I can’t express how serene the island is.

It’s relaxed atmosphere, luscious palms and white sand beaches are something I’ve always been jealous of and I’m glad I’ve finally been given the opportunity to visit.

I’ve experienced things I once dreamed of – horse riding, swimming with sharks and rays, visiting remote islands and diving under waterfalls.


The mantra ‘no problem’ (or ‘de nada’) is a something I fully embraced and is a mile away from the reality of Britain (especially considering its current state of affairs).

Taking your time is fully embraced by the locals and is something I wish would continue across the pond.


The island is stunning, the locals friendly and the weather is heaven. The Dominican attitude and culture is much to be desired and I hope to visit again someday. Until then I  carry on dreaming.

The loss of connection.

I’ve been camping around the Scottish Highlands for the past week. After exams finished I needed to get away and seek adventure. The towns are small and quaint but the views are breathtaking.

I realised this week that the loss of my mobile was more of a relief than a hindrance. To get back to the old art of map reading and getting lost has been bliss. The wall that sheltered me from the continuous world of text, email and phone calls was something I craved – the solitude was bliss.

And now I am back in Glasgow, I can not deny that the week spent in the Highlands was less tedious than the time I have spent writing this post on my laptop. Sat on my bed in my empty student room surrounded by nothing but blank walls, full suitcases and bags, all suggesting I will be leaving soon, and together allude a sight more lonesome. There is a feeling of loss; of change, and most importantly of going home.

I can’t wait to be reunited with family and friends, to enjoy the benefits of a full fridge and to unwind in a luxurious bath instead of a tiny airport cubicle of a shower I have cramped myself in to for the past year. First year of university is over and with it comes excitement for summer. So let it begin.

 

I suffer with resting bitch face and a chronic hatred of people. 

Spending 3 days in Barcelona with a group of people you’ve never met before teaches you a lot about yourself.

It has taught me that my unwavering condition of resting bitch face is undoubtedly still present. With remarks of ‘I thought you were a bitch when I first saw you’ or ‘you scared me a little’ still being made in full force – how honoured I feel.

It has taught me that I am no longer tolerate of people. If I’m tired I won’t hide it – I’m going to be silent and possibly a little bit grumpy too. I’m possibly going to have a chronic hatred towards you for a little while as well – it’s nothing personal.

It has taught me that if I have something to say, I’m most likely going to say it.

And it has taught me that if a girl is unbelievably tired, don’t ask her to take off her shoes at security because havoc will ensue.


Barcelona has once again astounded me with its beauty. And although I’ve explored its streets once before, I can’t help but be dazzled by it.The destinations I met on my last visit stand as proud as they did back then – oozing the confidence of the people.

Barcelona is undoubtly a place of tranquillity. It’s unique architecture and zones leave much to be desired and I will always spend hours examining their every  detail.

Le Eiffel Tower

There are so many  photographs of the Eiffel Tower that each view point has become unoriginal. I gave myself a challenge to find a view point of the tower that I had not seen before. These are the two results of that challenge:

Both times I chose to move the tower into the background – something which is rarely done.

The second photograph of the carosel with the tower in the background is possibly my favourite of the whole trip.

Part 1: Introduction of Paris

Part 2: Sacre-Couer

Part 3: Notre-Dame

The Hunchback of Notre-Dame – the famous Cathedral of Paris

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERANotre-Dame Cathedral. Well-known for it award-winning appearance in Disney’s the Hunchback of Notre-Dame, is one of the most famous tourist attractions in Paris.

Details around the door.
Details around the door.

Its beauty is baffling. Its exterior architectural details are so delicate and intricate that as an art student, I am perplexed by there beauty; everyone should be. The skill, precision and time it must have taken to create such delightful detailing is extraordinary. How anyone could have the patience is beyond me.

Close up of details.
Close up of details.
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Interior view.

Unfortunately, their wasn’t enough time in my schedule to go to the top but my friends told me the view is exquisite and the gargoyles are wonderful.

The interior of the Notre-Dame is opposite to its exterior. It is a place of calm and tranquillity. Allowing the opportunity for prayer and reflection.

There are chances on the perimeter to light a candle for loved ones costing a small donation. Even if you are not religious, it gives the opportunity for remembrance.

If you do want to visit Notre-Dame, I recommend going early morning as the queues become hectic around noon!

Part 1: Introduction of Paris

Part 2: Sacre-Couer

Part 4: Eiffel Tower

Whose steps nearly killed me; Sacre-Couer

OLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAOLYMPUS DIGITAL CAMERAThe Sacre-Couer is situated in Monmatre, on top of a very big hill.

Known as the Sacred Heart of Paris, Sacre-Couer is a Roman Catholic Church with a small minor basilica and a crypt. It is dedicated to the Sacred Heart of Jesus, and even if you aren’t religious, it is a must see. The beauty and complexity of the Church is incredible.

Now, having travelled to Barcelona last year, stairs aren’t a problem for me. Travelling up to Parc Guell was quite a challenge but I made it. However, since last year my level of fitness has apparently deteriorated. The stairs going up to Sacre-Couer did leave me quite breathless. Although don’t let this deter you, the breathlessness is definitely worth it. The views of Paris are incredible!

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Unfortunately, no pictures are allowed to be taken inside but there are cheap markets around Sacre-Couer if you want to pick up post cards with are definitely worth it.

I do insist you have a wonder inside as you will not be disappointed. And one piece of advice is to look up; the ceiling is incredible. Filled with religious paintings with will leave you breathless again.

Part 1: Introduction to Paris

Part 3: Notre-Dame Cathedral

Part 4: Eiffel Tower